“They Brought The Russians To Clean The Streets And The Ethiopians To Guard The Malls.”

The JTA has a new article on the tensions between the Ethiopian Jewish community in Israel and the Falash Mura, descendants of Ethiopian Jews who converted to Christianity 100 years ago and who are now returning to Judaism and immigrating to Israel with the backing of the Rabbinut:

Rabbi Yosef Hadane, the [Shas-affiliated] chief rabbi for the Ethiopian Jews in
Israel [and the first Ethiopian Jewish rabbi], said the controversy had mainly to do with confirming which of
the new immigrants truly had Jewish roots.

“They want Jews to come, not non-Jews,” Hadane said.

He also said there were stark divisions between the communities when it
came to religious practice. The veterans, for example, prefer to pray
in the traditional Ethiopian language of prayer called Ge’ez while the
Falash Mura pray in Hebrew. The Falash Mura will also often only eat
food deemed kosher by the Chief Rabbinate while the veteran Ethiopians
follow kashrut standards set by their elders.

The two communities, Hadane said, live fairly separate lives in Israel.

As the JTA notes, rumors about the nature of the Falash Mura continue to proliferate in the Ethiopian Jewish community:

Adding to the sense of alienation are rumors circulating in the veteran
Ethiopian community that some Falash Mura return to Christianity once
they are in Israel, even attending church services. Suspicions have
been heightened by rumors that Christian missionaries who falsely
converted to Judaism are among those immigrating.

I have been told by a well-placed source that at least some of these rumors can be documented, and I am waiting to see that documentation. But, it appears to me the root of some of this is the fear that Falash Mura will use up meager resources, and that Ethiopian Jews will be left even further behind.

And how far behind is the average Ethiopian Jew?

At an Ethiopian restaurant and bar a few blocks away [from Jerusalem’s Machane Yehuda market], veteran
Ethiopians gather at the end of the day. Among them is a 23-year-old
who calls himself Jimmy. He is bitter about his life, and says he does
not understand why the country is contemplating bringing more
Ethiopians here.

“We don’t feel like we are part of this
society,” he said. “If the first and second immigration waves did not
work, why should the third and fourth ones work?”

He works as
a security guard, he says, “like every other Ethiopian you have ever
met.” He then repeats a bit of immigrant humor, “They brought the
Russians to clean the streets and the Ethiopians to guard the malls.”

Jimmy said he hopes to fly to Ethiopia in the next few months on a
“trial visit” with a few other Ethiopian Israeli friends to see if,
perhaps, their futures are there, instead of in the Jewish state.

And that says more about the quality of Israel’s immigrant absorption than I could ever write.

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12 Comments

Filed under Ethiopian Jews, Israel

12 responses to ““They Brought The Russians To Clean The Streets And The Ethiopians To Guard The Malls.”

  1. Masorti

    And what about the number of Russian Jews who have actually returned to Russia?

  2. Russia has a growing economy and many opportunities for educated people to advance.

    Ethiopia is a Third World country with no economy to speak of. Going back there for “greater opportunities” is truly sad.

  3. Yochanan Lavie

    We must do better for our Ethiopian brethren. Also, we should respect their time-honored form of Judaism, which in many ways is more biblical than rabbinic Judaism. Moshe Rabbenu didn’t come from the shtetl, and I bet he didn’t wear a striemel (not that there’s anything wrong with that, either). Diversity is a strength.

  4. Anonymous

    I heard that the ethiopians aren’t really Jewish

  5. Anonymous

    “Moshe Rabbenu didn’t come from the shtetl, and I bet he didn’t wear a striemel”
    Ya and I bet he didnt have a HUGE green cross tattooed on his face.

  6. Anonymous

    “Moshe Rabbenu didn’t come from the shtetl, and I bet he didn’t wear a striemel”
    Ya and I bet he didnt have a HUGE green cross tattooed on his face.

  7. Right! And he didn’t have any of those big yellow signs carried by the Schneersonites, either!

  8. I have a halachic question for you, is waiving a yellow flag with a picture of a crown and the word moshiach the same as tatooing a cross on your face?

  9. “I have a halachic question for you, is waiving a yellow flag with a picture of a crown and the word moshiach the same as tatooing a cross on your face?”

    The yellow flag is far worse. Why?

    Those Ethiopians with tatooed crosses had Jewish grandparents or great-grandparents. Their knowledge of Judaism is scant at best.

    Compare that to the neo-Christians of Chabad, men with smicha and years of yeshiva studies turning a dead man into a demigod.

    Chabad is far worse.

  10. pushkina

    one of my father’s acquaintances tld me that those huge green crosses were tattooed (especially on girls) as means to keep them safe from xtians.

    you anonymous, pious orthodox jews: you see how long you’d last in an ethiopian rural setting with a star of david tatooed on your forehead. and no possibility of israel flying in and saving your backside.

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